7 Million Bats Killed By White Nose Syndrome: How You Can Help
This is an issue very dear to my heart. Years ago I used to live on an island in the North filled with bats. Over the years I have watched their numbers dwindle.
Part of this is due to tourists. People that aren’t used to bats often worry that they are going to fly into their hair or attack them.  The chances of this happening are so slim it’s almost nonexistent. So sometimes people squish them. They spray them with bug spray. (Extra crazy considering the little guys do a marvelous job keeping bugs away from us) They scream and flail about when they fly overhead. But the bats aren’t interested in you. They are shy and (understandably) scared of people. They would occasionally cling to a window screen or nestle in an archway, but they don’t bother people even when they are being poked with sticks or being surrounded by flashbulbs and clicking cameras. 
White nose syndrome is very serious. It’s wiping them out. We need bats. They are a vital part of the ecosystem. These little guys provide billions in free pest removal services. (Seriously. They eat bugs. Want less mosquitos? Advocate for the bats!) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been warned about the severity of the situation but have yet to take any serious action.  Defenders of Wildlife are asking to have the Northern Long Eared Bat listed as endangered. While although there is presently no cure for white nose syndrome, the protection this would provide would extend to to their habitats in an effort to better study and preserve them. 
PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION BY AUGUST 29TH!!! THIS IS THE DEADLINE THE FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE IS PROVIDING FOR COMMENTS.

7 Million Bats Killed By White Nose Syndrome: How You Can Help

This is an issue very dear to my heart. Years ago I used to live on an island in the North filled with bats. Over the years I have watched their numbers dwindle.

Part of this is due to tourists. People that aren’t used to bats often worry that they are going to fly into their hair or attack them.  The chances of this happening are so slim it’s almost nonexistent. So sometimes people squish them. They spray them with bug spray. (Extra crazy considering the little guys do a marvelous job keeping bugs away from us) They scream and flail about when they fly overhead. But the bats aren’t interested in you. They are shy and (understandably) scared of people. They would occasionally cling to a window screen or nestle in an archway, but they don’t bother people even when they are being poked with sticks or being surrounded by flashbulbs and clicking cameras. 

White nose syndrome is very serious. It’s wiping them out. We need bats. They are a vital part of the ecosystem. These little guys provide billions in free pest removal services. (Seriously. They eat bugs. Want less mosquitos? Advocate for the bats!) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been warned about the severity of the situation but have yet to take any serious action.  Defenders of Wildlife are asking to have the Northern Long Eared Bat listed as endangered. While although there is presently no cure for white nose syndrome, the protection this would provide would extend to to their habitats in an effort to better study and preserve them. 

PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION BY AUGUST 29TH!!! THIS IS THE DEADLINE THE FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE IS PROVIDING FOR COMMENTS.